February Is National Heart Month… So Here Are Some Good Points And Information For You And Your Pet… Have A Happy Healthy Heart Month

 

 

catdogheart

 

Keeping your dogs heart healthy is very similar to what you would do to keep your own heart healthy. Good diet , exercise,  good oral care,low stress environment and lots of playtime  are great ways to maintain your pups heart health.

Heart disease in canines can be congenital (hereditary), but the vast majority of cases (95 percent) are acquired. It is typically a condition of middle-aged and older dogs, and involves either the heart muscle itself, or the valves of the heart.

Common heart disorders in dogs include:

· Valvular disease- Heart valve problems are the most common type of canine heart disease. The valves of the heart weaken with age and begin to leak when the heart muscle pumps.

· Heart Worm Disease- Mosquitoes are the carriers. The worms take up residence in the heart and cause disease.

· Myocarditis – an inflammation of the heart caused by infection (usually bacterial). Myocarditis both weakens and enlarges the heart muscle.

· Pericardial disease, in which the protective sac around a dog’s heart fills with liquid, interfering with the normal beating mechanism.

· Arrhythmia, which is an irregular heartbeat brought on by a problem with the body’s electrical control system.

Interestingly, one of the most common reasons for heart disease in humans, blocked arteries, is rare in dogs. Unfortunately, heart problems in dogs are relatively common. A heart murmur can be caused by abnormal blood flow within the heart, usually involving the heart valves. Murmurs can also be caused by problems in communication between the left and right sides of the heart. Murmurs can be present at birth (congenital). They can also be acquired due to disease or the aging process.

Heart murmurs in puppies tend to be pretty innocent… but with older dogs it should be looked into. Heart issues can be difficult to detect but there are some signs that should not be ignored

·         Coughing that does not go away after 4 to 5 days

·         Blue or Bluish appearing tongue ( this is serious so vet  asap.)

·         Loss of appetite

·         Fatigue, weakness, loss of stamina, decreased exercise endurance

·         Too fast or too slow heart beat; increased respiratory effort, including increased respiratory rate

·         Heart rate depending on size of dog.. little guys beat faster 60-140 beats per minute

·         Breaths per minute you can count these but make sure your pup is at rest 10-35 per  minute the full up/down motion is considered one breath.

Certain breeds are more prone to heart problems:

Breed Heart Condition

Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, Dachshund, Small breeds Acquired mitral valve disease

Bull Terrier, Rottweiler Congenital mitral valve disease

Boxer, Cocker Spaniel, Doberman Pinscher, Great Dane, Irish Wolfhound, Labrador Retriever Myocardial failure

Cocker and English Springer Spaniels, German Shepherd, Maltese, Poodle Patent ductus arteriosus

Boxer, Cocker Spaniel, English Bulldog, Mastiff, Miniature Schnauzer, Samoyed, West Highland White TerrierPulmonary stenosis

Boxer, German Shepherd, Golden Retriever, Newfoundland, Rottweiler Subvalvular aortic stenosis

Labrador Retriever Congenital tricuspid valve disease

English Springer Spaniel Ventricular septal defect

The good news is, if your pup is diagnosed with any if the above in most cases there is a lot you can do to keep them happy and healthy.

Diet and supplements play a big role in your dogs heart health, along with good dental health.

For more information on click on the link below

http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2015/10/22/pet-heart-disease.aspx

There are also some great acupressure points that can also help if your dog has been diagnosed, or can be used as preventative  to keep the heart strong and functional especially if your dog is on the list above.

PE6 Inside of the front limb  between the tendons three cun above the crease in the wrist ( transverse carpal crease)

HT 7 PE7 in the depression between the tendon and the ligament it is a natural depression and pretty easy to find just above the bend in the wrist. Your fingers will slide in the groove on either side. Hold both sides that is actually 2 points Ht7 and Pe7

CV17 ventral midline 4th intercostal space  caudal border of the elbows

LIV3  between the 2nd and 3rd metatarsal  (back legs)

KI 27    found between the sternum and the first rib and 2nd rib two cun off the ventral midline

 

Cat parent’s this one is for you.

 

As we know, cats are very stoic and masters of hiding their ailments. Heart health is very important so here is some information including diseases, symptoms, and recommendations for your cats heart health.

Feline hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common heart disease seen in felines. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a term used when there is no known cause, however secondary, is brought about by other conditions such as high blood pressure, hyperthyroidism etc.

Cats with secondary hypertrophic cardiomyopathy tend to be older.

The main feature of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is excessive thickening of the left ventricular wall, papillary muscles and septum.  This enlargement causes stiffening and prevents the heart from expanding (to receive blood) properly.  It may also reduce the ability of the valves to work properly, and in some circumstances obstruct the flow of blood out of the heart. Arrhythmias, irregularities of the heart beat and conduction disturbances are also common complications of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

The thickened wall sometimes distorts one leaflet of the mitral valve, causing it to leak.

Fluid can leak into the lungs causing heart failure.

Blood clots can form in the left atrium and be carried into the systemic arterial system, most often lodging in the terminal artery, causing paralysis of the hind legs.

Cardio=heart, myopathy=muscle disease and hypertrophic=thickened. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy tends to affect cats one to five years of age, and male cats are more commonly affected.

What are the symptoms of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy?

A cat with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy may display no symptoms at all, but die suddenly and unexpectedly.  Symptoms may include.

·         Lethargy

·         Anorexia

·         Weight loss

·         Rapid,  laboured and noisy breathing

·         Decreased activity

·         Congestive heart failure

·         Irregular heart rhythm

·         Heart murmur

·         Gagging

·         Lameness or paralysis of the hind legs

Are some cats more prone than others?

In humans HCM can be inherited as an autosomal manner. It appears Maine Coons and American Shorthairs also have a predisposition towards HCM.

How is hypertrophic cardiomyopathy diagnosed?

A physical examination may reveal abnormal heart or lung sounds, irregular or gallop heart rhythm or heart murmur, this may well be the first indication that your cat has HCM.

Echocardiogram (heart ultrasound) is the best diagnostic tool for HCM. Your veterinarian will evaluate the size, shape and functioning of the heart.

X-Ray can show if there is fluid in the chest and heart enlargement.

Electrocardiogram. is a test that measures the electrical activity of the heartbeat.

Blood tests including a complete blood count and chemistry panel. These can help provide information on the function of other organs. This information is important when determining methods of treatment.

Thyroid function test to determine if the cause is due to hyperthyroidism.

Arterial blood pressure to check for hypertension.

How is hypertrophic cardiomyopathy treated?

Asymptomatic cats may require no treatment, but your veterinarian will want to monitor him/her closely. It is not possible to cure HCM, treatment is aimed at controlling symptoms and preventing complications.

The thick ventricles of HCM contract and relax abnormally, and to assist the relaxation phase some drugs may be necessary. Beta blocking drugs and calcium blocking channels may be prescribed to assist.

If the cat has congestive heart failure, diuretics may be prescribed. Restricting activity also reduces the strain on the heart and your veterinarian may prescribe a period of cage rest.

For more information click on the links below:

http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2012/05/28/feline-hcm-treatment.aspx

http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2015/10/22/pet-heart-disease.aspx

Here are a few points  to keep your cat’s heart happy and balanced

 LI4 LU11 is on either side of the dew claw of the front paw

PE6 Inside of the front limb  between the tendons three cun above the crease in the wrist ( transverse carpal crease)

HT 7 PE7 in the depression between the tendon and the ligament it is a natural depression and pretty easy to find just above the bend in the wrist. Your fingers will slide in the groove on either side. Hold bold sides that is actually 2 points Ht7 and Pe7 This point is considered to be the “source point” of the Heart meridian. It is very nourishing to all aspects of the heart,this clears the mind and calms the spirit great relaxation point.

LIV3  between the 2nd and 3rd metatarsal bones

Heart points newsletterblog2016

Heart points cat2

Share
-->