If You Or Your Pet Are A Little Near Or Far Sited This Point May Help

 

dogs-in-glasses-1

 

This is a great point for humans and canines. I have used it on my senior clients with good results and now there is science behind it ..

GB37 has been used for the treatment of eye related disorders for over a thousand years. The advent of functional MRI imaging has allowed for researchers to measure the specific regions of the brain activated by acupoint stimulation. Clear evidence from this study demonstrates that GB37 acupuncture needle stimulation activates areas of the brain responsible for vision. Researchers carefully noted that the activation of the visual cortex lasted longer than expected following the acupuncture point stimulation. They also referenced this lasting effect as the “sustained effect of acupuncture” and note that future study designs should take into account acupuncture’s ability to make lasting changes. The researchers note that some studies seek to measure an instant on and off effect rather than measuring the duration of acupuncture’s physiological effects.

http://www.healthcmi.com/acupuncturist-news-online/693-mriacupuncturevisiongb?goback=%2Egde_2328513_member_213799169

Here are a few other points to help with vision for you and your pet

GB 37 is from the study the others are just good ones to support eye health. Your pup may not love the points close to the eye but try them on yourself and see what you think :-)

Also note if you or your pet experience any sudden change in vision or acute eye irritation consult your Dr. or Vet immediately as this could be a sign of a medical emergency

 

eye points blog

GB37  five cun above the lateral malleolus (ankle bone on the outside of theback legs)

LIv2 on the back legs where the 2nd toe meets the paw

LIv3 between the 2nd and 3rd metatarsal bones of the back legs  Distal point for eye issues, also benefits hock pain and removes toxins from the body Tonifies liver

Acupuncture Points Around the Eye

There are several powerful acupuncture points around the eyes that promote eye health. These points bring Qi and blood to the eyes to nourish the tissue and improve the condition of the eyes.

Jingming (BL1-1) – When translated, Jingming means Bright eyes. This point is located in the inner corner of the eye. It is one of the primary points to bring Qi and blood to the eyes and is used for eye problems of all kinds including early-stage cataracts, glaucoma, night blindness, conjunctivitis and blurred vision.

Zanzhu (BL-2) – This point lies in the depression at the inner end of the eyebrow. Like Jingming, it is a primary point for the eyes and is used for all types of eye problems. Some of the indications to use this point include headache, blurring or failing of vision, pain in the supraorbital region, excessive tearing, redness, swelling and pain of the eye, twitching of the eyelids and glaucoma.

Sizhukong (TH 23) – In the hollow at the outside end of the eyebrow. This point is used for eye and facial problems including headaches, redness and pain of the eye, blurring of vision, twitching of the eyelids, toothache and facial paralysis.

Tongziliao (GB 1) – Located on the outside corner of the eye. This point is used to brighten the eyes as well as for headaches, redness and pain of the eyes, failing or blurring of vision, photophobia, dry, itchy eyes, early-stage cataracts and conjunctivitis.

 

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If Your Pup Gets A Little Car Sick, We Have Some Good Tips and Points To Help

carsick dog

 

Summer is almost over,  and for a lot of families they have one more trip before school starts.  If its a car trip and you have planning on taking your pup, these tips and points may help.

Here are  some great tips from Dr. Karen Becker :

Prevention tips:

  • Most dogs don’t get carsick on an empty stomach, so make sure there are several hours (at least two) between her last meal and a ride in the car. Don’t withhold water, however.

And keep in mind this may or may not work for your pet, as some dogs need a little something in their stomach to prevent motion sickness. If your pet dry heaves or vomits bile in the car several hours after eating, before your next outing, try giving her a couple tablespoons of food or a few treats to see if she does better with something in her tummy.

  • If your dog travels in a crate (which is the safest method of canine travel), move it from spot to spot in the car to see if the location of the crate makes a difference in how he’s feeling. Some dogs do best if the crate is placed in the rear compartment of an SUV. Others do well on the back seat. Some small dogs prefer their crate to sit on the floor of the front passenger seat where they can see the driver, but not much else. (This location is typically fine in colder weather, but be careful during the summer months, as forward compartment floor space can heat up quickly.)

If you use a harness or other type of restraint, again, try moving your dog from seat to seat if possible to learn where he feels most comfortable.

  • Change your dog’s perception of traveling in the car. Pick a place close to home (no longer than a 10 minute drive from your house) that your dog enjoys. It could be the dog park or a nearby hiking trail.

Either bring someone along to calm your dog while you’re driving, or speak gently and reassuringly to him along the way. Once you reach your destination, devote your attention to your dog, playing or hiking with him, and make the outing fun for him.

On the ride back, again, do whatever works to calm your dog’s nerves. Once you’re home, have another vigorous play session and then let him rest. Repeat this routine at a minimum once a week so your dog learns to associate car rides with fun destinations and playtime with you.

  • Stop frequently on long trips, as some dogs need breaks to prevent motion sickness. A good guideline is to stop after an hour or two and let your dog out (on a leash, of course) to relieve himself. You can also offer him a drink of water or some ice chips to chew.
  • Diffuse the essential oil of lavender in your car by adding a drop to your pet’s collar or place a few drops on a cotton ball close to your pet; use a custom blend of stress relieving essential oils on a Sniff-It (created by my client, Lou Ann!); try Bach Flower essences such as Scleranthus, Rock Rose, or Rescue Remedy; offer ginger root a few hours before traveling.
  • For severe cases of nausea in big dogs, I use a commercially available peppermint oil blend in caplet form. Also consider trying a variety of homeopathic remedies based on your pet’s particular symptoms, including Cocculus, Argentum, Ipecac, and Aconitum.
  • Try a T-Touch anxiety wrap. (Video demonstration).
  • This one may seem a little weird, but it can’t hurt to give it a try. As you’re driving along, point out scenery and other animals to your dog if she’s able to see out the window. Call her by name in an excited voice, and point or turn your head in the direction of the thing you want her to notice.

She may or may not catch on initially, but dogs that ride around a lot with their owners often wind up looking like little furry people as they gaze out the window and take in the sights. The idea with a stressed or potentially carsick dog is to involve her in her surroundings, generate a little pleasant buzz in the car, and provide a distraction for her.

  • Consider driving with the windows down as much as possible (not all the way down, just enough to let fresh air in). It’s not a great idea to allow your dog to stick her head out the window, but if it seems to help her feel more comfortable, make sure she’s very securely harnessed in, and invest in a pair of “doggles” (protective eyewear for dogs) to protect her eyes from sudden rushes of air, bugs, and flying debris.

For the full article click here   http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2015/08/28/dog-car-sickness.aspx

 

If you have  a pup that does not do well in the  car,  or has motion sickness or gets a little dizzy  these two points are very beneficial. In addition if your pup has vertigo these points are also a great help.

If car trips short or long  are not fun for your pup try doing these points before the ride and if there is a second person in the car possibly during the ride and see if it helps.

Note that any sudden onset of dizziness or staggering should be checked out by your Vet immediately as it may be a far more serious issue than motion sickness …

The choice of acupuncture points is consistent with Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) theory. PC6 and ST36 are   indicated for the treatment of nausea, vomiting, hiccups  among other things

Click on the link below as it explains how and why these points work…  It is quite intersting

http://www.healthcmi.com/Acupuncture-Continuing-Education-News/1496-acupuncture-relieves-dizziness-and-vertigo#sthash.cq09XKPS.dpuf

PC6 is located 2 cun above the transverse wrist crease between the tendons of the palmaris longus and flexor carpi radialis. PC6 is a luo point and a confluent point of the yinwei channel.

ST36 is 3 cun below ST35 and is one finger breadth from the anterior crest of the tibia in the tibialis anterior muscle. Or find the front of the knee and slide your finger down into the little groove on the lateral side of each knee

points for car sickness blog

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Is Your Pup A Little Constipated ? We Have A Few Points For That

constipated pup

This Summer has  been very hot and dry lots of flaky skin and allergies. In TCM the Lung/ Large Intestine Meridian is directly connected to the skin. So if the skin is dry odds are the your pup is lacking moisture which can result in constipation.

So how is your dog pooping? Not the most flowery subject but an important one.

Poop gives us so much information on how are dogs are doing. Digestion and gut health are big factors in our well being, as well as our pets.  So if your pup is having a bout of constipation, it may just be he or she  isn’t getting quite enough water in his or her diet, the diet itself, or it could be something more serious.

Constipation can happen on occassion to your pup throughout their lifetime. If it does not resolve in a few days you definitely want to make sure you see your vet, as it can be a symptom of a more serious problem in the colon.  If constipation goes on too long it can result in megacolon.

Great article below by  Dr. Becker on how to identfy constipation and what to do ; Also  a study on good points for constipation, and a few for you to try on you or your pup.  Happy Pointing…

Dr. Becker’s Comments:

Your dog is constipated when he either has difficulty pooping (and feces produced are dry and hard) or isn’t pooping at all.

If solid waste stays in your dog’s colon too long, all the moisture in it will be absorbed and stools will become dry, hard, and difficult to pass.

If the situation is left untreated, your dog’s large intestine can actually stretch to the point where it can no longer do its job effectively. This is a chronic condition known as megacolon, and is actually more common in cats than dogs. Our goal is to prevent pets from ever having such chronic and longstanding bowel issues.

 

http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2017/07/23/dog-cat-constipation.aspx

 

Acupuncture  study for constipation

http://www.healthcmi.com/Acupuncture-Continuing-Education-News/1517-acupuncture-relieves-constipation

 

A few points to try from the study:

LI4 is on inside of the dew claw on the front paw.
ST 36 find the front of the knee and slide your finger down into the little groove on the lateral side of each knee.
ST25*  On the ventral midline 2 cun lateral to the umbilicus. Find your pups belly button it is usually a bit raised and bumpy and then depending on the size of your pup the point will be anywhere from one to two finger widths off the belly button
Cun “small measurement”  the find the distance between the wrist and the elbow put your finger there;  half that distance half it again and half it again, The distance between your finger and the wrist is 1 cun so it will be a personal measurement for each animal

 

 

 

points  for Constipation

 

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Is The 4th Of July Stressful For Your Pup? If So Here Are A Few Tips, Points And Essential Oils That May Help

fireworks bassett

 

Ok so 4th of July…. barbecues, picnics, family, friends and fireworks… Which is all lots of fun but your pets may not think so. It is really important to keep them calm, safe and indoors. If you have a pet that is sensitive to loud noises and thinks the sky is falling or worse here are a few things you can do.

Basic things:
Here are some simple ways to help you and your pooch (and kitty) safe during 4th of July festivities.

KEEP PETS INDOORS
Keep your pets in a safe, enclosed room, preferably one without windows. If you’re having guests over, consider keeping pets in a room that’s off-limits to guests, with plenty of water and food.

CREATE A CALMING ENVIRONMENT
Surround pets with their favorite toys and other familiar objects. Sometimes the smell of an article of clothing from your laundry can help comfort them. Play soothing music and keep the room as quiet as possible by closing doors, windows, and blinds, bu t create ambient noise ie turn up the tv and play music a bit louder to drown out the fireworks.

KEEP AWAY FROM FIREWORKS
Even if your pet doesn’t seem obviously upset by fireworks, they can still cause harm to pets. Avoid potential burns, injuries, or possible ingestion by keeping all pets out of the vicinity of fireworks.

UPDATE IDENTIFICATION
The biggest risk of all this 4th of July is that pets will get loose and become lost. Even if a pet is secured inside, the sound of fireworks can cause them to panic – sometimes even breaking through glass windows. Make sure your pets are microchipped and wearing identification tags. Dogs should have a County License on their collar

PREVENTATIVE  MEASURES:
Thunder shirts are good tool to use for calming and creating a sense of safety for your pet. Eos  and rescue remedy may also be helpful

There are also some great calming points to use before the big day during and afterwards. If you can start these about a week before and do them in once a day and maybe twice on the 4th;  it may help keep your pets from getting really worked up. You can use these on  cats as well ( if they will let you)l

Hold points lightly  with your finger or thumb you don’t’ need a lot of pressure for this  to work use the same pressure that you would use to touch your eyelid. If  they yawn or licks their lips or does the deep breathing and sighing  you are doing a great job

GV20 dorsal midline between the ears there is usually a bump where the point is..revives consciousness clears brain calms mind
GB20  Right behind the skull or occipital bone one finger off the cervical spine on either side in the divots. Also a good relaxation point good point to ease over thinking. Pulls the energy down from the head releases built up heat
GV17  Right behind the skull in between the GB 20 points. Little divot under the bump. Great point to disperse energy and creates calm.
HT7 PE7 In the depression between the tendon and the ligament it is a natural depression and pretty easy to find just above the bend in the wrist. Your fingers will slide in the groove on either side. Hold bold sides that is actually 2 points Ht7 and Pe7 this clears the mind and calms the spirit great relaxation point  pulls heat out of the head…
ST36 Find the front of the knee and slide your finger down into the little groove on the lateral side of each knee  This point serves double duty it calms the mind and helps with anxiety, worry and any kind of stress that  produce  anxiety . It is also a great immune point and supports the immune system in case it has been over stressed
KI3 BL60 Top of the hock thin skin your fingers will slide into it on either side it is kind of like our Achilles this is actually two points KI3 and BL60 KI3 In TCM fear is housed in the kidneys so it will help alleviate unnecessary fear.  BL 60 is called the aspirin point and is good one to help with any kind of pain or irritation in the body

4th of July Points

 

Also there are some essential oil recipes  you can try

canine calming blendfrenzy free fireworksfear free

If you have any questions please feel free to email us at Info@reikiforallcreatures.com Also if you do try these points please let us know if there was a change.

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Are You Prepared For a Pet Emergency? Here Are Some Necessary Items For Your Pet First Aid Kit

puppy first aid

No one plans on having their pet get injured or become sick, but it happens, and your best defense is to be prepared.

It is finally Summer  and there are so many great activities for dogs :

Hiking, Dock Diving, Surfing, Agility, Lure Coursing, Herding Flyball…  and just going to the dog park or the beach.

So before you leave home with your pooch think about putting a pet first aid kit in your car.  Definitely have a list of emergency numbers—include the number for your normal vet, emergency vet, animal control, and animal poison control center either in your phone or in your car.

Time is a big factor for a positive outcome so having these numbers handy can make a big difference.  Also taking a pet first aid course is another great tool to have just in case.  

For an instructor in your area click here http://www.pettech.net/index.php

Here are some basic items to put in your kit:

  • Tweezers
  • Latex (or hypoallergenic material) gloves
  • Gauze roll
  • Gauze sponges in a variety of sizes
  • Needle-nose pliers
  • Elastic cling bandage
  • Medical tape
  • Small scissors
  • Tongue depressors
  • Clean cloth, towel, and compact emergency blanket
  • Muzzle (even the sweetest animals may become aggressive when in pain)
  • Magnifying glass
  • Hydrogen peroxide (3 percent)
  • Antiseptic towelettes
  • Non-adhesive sterile pads
  • Sterile saline wash
  • Sterile eye lubricant
  • Eye dropper
  • Instant cold pack
  • Topical antibiotic ointment
  • Petroleum jelly
  • Small flashlight
  • Cotton-tipped swabs
  • Diphenhydramine (aka Benadryl—get approval from your veterinarian first)

Below are some jing well points you can use on the way to vet

Have fun, be prepared and stay safe

Jing well  emergency

 

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