Chronic Inflammation Can Cause A Lot of Damage To The Body. The Acupuncture Point ST36, Helps To Alleviate Chronic Inflammation

 

old golden

Chronic inflammation is involved in a variety of disease processes. Inflammation is part of the body’s natural response to injuries, but if the condition persists it can lead to further damage. Auto Immune diseases such as Rheumatoid Arthritis  Lupus, IBD,  Type 2 Diabetes and  even something as simple as allergies are all part of chronic inflammation. According to the study below  manual Acupuncture  at ST36 reduced inflammation. The study is interesting as it explains how ST36 works to downgrade TNF in the body. So if your pup  has a chronic inflammation issue ST36 may be a good add to your wellness plan .ST36 is an amazing point. If you follow this blog you can see how often it is used and for many different purposes.  Just put ST36 in the search bar and see what comes up..

 

Point and Article Below

ST36 find the front of the knee and slide your finger down into the little groove on the lateral side of each knee

 

st36 dog human

Anti-inflammatory Acupuncture

Acupuncture reduces inflammation and researchers have discovered how it works. In a laboratory controlled scientific investigation, a key biological marker has been identified, quantified, and directly correlated with the application of acupuncture. Acupuncture successfully down regulates a pro-inflammatory biochemical (tumor necrosis factor alpha), which results in anti-inflammatory responses. In addition, the researchers have mapped the neural pathways by which acupuncture signaling stimulates anti-inflammatory effects.

Researchers in Korea have identified a mechanism by which acupuncture stimulation at the acupoint ST36 (Zusanli) has an anti-inflammatory effect. By downregulating tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), acupuncture relieves systemic inflammation. By testing the effects that a splenic neurectomy and vagotomy have on TNF-α levels in the spleen and the brain, Lim et al. found that the anti-inflammatory effects of ST36 (Zusanli) rely on the vagus nerve pathway. Both manual acupuncture stimulation (MAC) and electroacupuncture (EAC) induce c-Fos protein generation. However, only manual acupuncture stimulation has the effect of downregulating TNF-α; electroacupuncture has the opposite effect when applied to ST36.

Chronic inflammation is involved in a variety of disease processes. Inflammation is part of the body’s natural response to injuries, but if the condition persists it can lead to further damage. There are a number of factors related to chronic inflammation, including TNF-α. As an endogenous pyrogen, TNF-α is primarily involved in the regulation of immune cells. It is able to induce fever, inflammation, apoptosis, inhibit tumor growth, and inhibit virus replication. However, its dysregulation is implicated in the processes of a number of diseases including major depression, cancer, psoriasis, Alzheimer’s disease, and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The researchers in this study used lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to induce TNF-α production in lab mice. Next, they performed a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) DNA analysis, which “showed that TNF-α mRNA was highly induced in the spleen following LPS administration and was downregulated by MAC.”

The researchers also gave the mice either a splenic neurectomy or a vagotomy to discern which nerve pathway was responsible for transmitting the anti-inflammatory responses induced by the acupuncture treatments. They found that the TNF-α levels decreased with MAC but were re-elevated in mice with a splenic neurectomy and vagotomy, suggesting that “TNF-α induced in the spleen and the serum after LPS administration may be modulated by AS [acupuncture stimulation].” Another trial showed that CNQX (AMPA receptor blocker) and PPADS (selective purinergic antagonist) — which both inhibit the dorsal vagal complex (DVC) — also decreased splenic TNF-α, which implies the direct involvement of the vagus nerve in the modulation of TNF-α.

The vagus nerve is a cranial nerve best known for innervating the viscera. However, “growing bodies of evidence indicate that vagus nerve activity is important not only for homeostatic regulation of internal organs but also for the regulation of pathologic inflammatory reactions; thus, the vagus nerve acts as a bridge between the neural and immune systems. Notably, VNS can activate the a7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor on the macrophages in the spleen.”

The cholinergic response, mediated by the vagus nerve, directly controls a proinflammatory response by way of the inflammatory reflex. Several inflammatory diseases are regulated by the ‘cholinergic anti-inflammatory reflex,’ including rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, and obesity. Additionally, previous research finds that insulin resistance is caused by chronic inflammation resulting from immune and metabolic dysregulation; in addition, a decrease in vagus nerve activity is correlated with obesity. “Selective cholinergic activation within the efferent vagus nerve-mediated arm of the inflammatory reflex can suppress obesity-associated inflammation and reverse metabolic complications. These findings raise the intriguing possibility that dysregulation of vagus nerve-mediated signaling might contribute to the pathogenesis of obesity and its related comorbidities.”

Obesity has reached epidemic levels in many countries and is a precursor for many chronic diseases, including diabetes. Chronic inflammation is “a critical step in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Cholinergic mechanisms within the inflammatory reflex have, in the past 2 years, been implicated in attenuating obesity-related inflammation and metabolic complications. This knowledge has led to the exploration of novel therapeutic approaches in the treatment of obesity-related disorders.”

 

References

HD Lim et al., “Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Acupuncture Stimulation via the Vagus Nerve,” PloS one. 11, no. 3 (March 19, 2016), accessed February 3, 2017, pp 4-5. ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26991319

Valentin A. Pavlov and Kevin J. Tracey, The Vagus Nerve and the Inflammatory Reflex—linking Immunity and Metabolism, 8, no. 12, accessed February 3, 2017, ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4082307/

Yun-Kyoung Yim et al., Electro-Acupuncture at Acupoint ST36 Reduces Inflammation and Regulates Immune Activity in Collagen-Induced Arthritic Mice, 4, no. 1 (August 18, 2006), accessed February 3, 2017, ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1810363/

Lin, Lili, Nikola Skakavac, Xiaoyang Lin, Dong Lin, Mia C. Borlongan, Cesar V. Borlongan, and Chuanhai Cao. “Acupuncture-induced analgesia: the role of microglial inhibition.” Cell transplantation 25, no. 4 (2016): 621-628.

Zhang, Ruixin, Lixing Lao, Ke Ren, and Brian M. Berman. “Mechanisms of acupuncture–electroacupuncture on persistent pain.” The Journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists 120, no. 2 (2014): 482-503.

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Is Your Dog’s Water Causing Arthritis Like Symptoms?

Dog-drinking-water

Skeletal Fluorosis is a painful, debilitating disease caused by a build up of fluoride in the body. Early stages are marked by stiffness and painful joints, mimicking arthritis. Later stages are defined by “severe deformities as the ligaments of the neck and vertebrae calcify (harden), muscle tissue wastes away, and movement becomes more and more limited.” according to Elizabeth Renter of Natural Society

Most patients suffering from skeletalFluorosis show side effects from the high fluorine dose such as ruptures of the stomach lining and nausea.[8]Fluorine can also damage the thyroid gland leading to hyperparatthyroidism, the uncontrolled secretion of parathyroid hormones. These hormones regulate calcium concentration in the body. An elevated parathyroid hormone concentration results in a depletion of calcium in bone structures and thus a higher calcium concentration in the blood. As a result, bone flexibility decreases making the bone more amenable to fractures.[9]n

Flouride is cumulative in the body, it is found in our drinking water and in most commercial pet foods.  So keep an eye on your pooch especially if they are older and have been drinking tap water their whole life.  If your pet  is starting to get  a little stiffer and not as mobile this may be one of the reasons.    It is always recommended to see your vet to discuss.  In some cases eliminating Fluoride from your pets diet may improve their symptoms.

For more information click on the links below…Happy Drinking

http://www.dogsnaturallymagazine.com/dangers-dog-water/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skeletal_fluorosis

 

If your pet is getting a little stiff or has arthritis here are some good points to try.

Bai Hui At the lumbar sacral space or the universal spot on dogs there is a little dip and it is right before the tail meets the lumbar spine;   this is a great point for lower back and hip and leg stiffness and pain and a great calming and connecting point

 BL 40 Right behind the knee use in conjunction with Bai Hui on both legs This is the master point for hip and back benefits low back hip and strengthens stifles. Also benefits the hip and knee joint pain

 ST 36 find the front of the knee and slide your finger down into the little groove on the lateral side of each knee  This point serves double duty good point for lower back pain It is also a great immune point

 GB34 Between the head of the tibia and head of the fibula on the lateral side of the back leg down from the kneecap The point is found on the lateral aspect of the hind limb between the head of the tibia and fibula you can feel a space between the two bones and there will be a stop where the bones meet and a little depression that your finger will fall into.GB34 it is the influential point for tendons and ligaments  and is the sister meridian of the liver. helps strengthen his tendons and ligaments in hind legs also helps with blood flow.

 Bl 60 Ki3  top of the hock thin skin your fingers will slide into it on either side it is kind of like our Achilles this is actually two points Ki3 and BL60 K3 is a source point good for the kidneys which house original chi this will tonify source chi helps with circulation and Arthritis. Kidney’s Sister Meridian is the Bladder so that is helpful as well BL 60 is called the aspirin point and is good one to help with pain and stiffness in body .

 Sp6   3 cun above the medial malleolus or ankle bone this point is on the bone so just follow it up two finger widths on the  inside of the back leg. This is a great point to increase blood flow. It also reduces inflammation

 

Liv3  between the 2nd and 3rd metatarsal balances out the liver and also a great point for detox and  tendons and ligaments  

 Liv2 medial aspect of the 2nd digit distal to the metatarsal phalangial joint Relieves liver fire, Dispels wind, calms agitation

arthritis blog15

 

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Does Your Pet Have A Fear Based Issue That Does Not Make Sense? It May Be Pre-Programmed In His Or Her DNA

scared dog2

 

So this is interesting… Sometimes it is really hard to figure out why your pup is terrified of something  that other dogs are not  even concerned about.

Why are  some dogs are scared of fireworks or loud noises and others are not even bothered. How come  some dogs love the water and others are sure “it is going to kill them”. It turns out that fear or lack there of may have been passed down from their parents or possibly even their grandparents.

New research from Emory University School of Medicine, in Atlanta, has shown that it is possible for some information to be inherited biologically through chemical changes that occur in DNA. During the tests they learned that that mice can pass on learned information about traumatic or stressful experiences – in this case a fear of the smell of cherry blossom – to subsequent generations.

According to the Telegraph, Dr Brian Dias, from the department of psychiatry at Emory University, said: ”From a translational perspective, our results allow us to appreciate how the experiences of a parent, before even conceiving offspring, markedly influence both structure and function in the nervous system of subsequent generations.

Another good example of this is children who are afraid of dogs that have never had a bad encounter with one. People usually surmise that one of the parents are afraid, which is true;but according to this study, that fear may already be programmed into the child’s DNA. So it runs deep and then is    re- enforced by the parents actions…

Rescue dogs who are fearful most likely have had a bad experience but their mom or dad may have had something happen as well that is programmed into their DNA ….so just something to consider

In TCM ( Traditional Chinese Medicine) Fear is housed in the kidneys and to make it even more interesting the kidneys house prenatal chi or in western speak genetics, so it all kind of ties together and is a solid clue to help solve the fear puzzle.

Here are are two points that may help with fear based issues both Kidney points….

KI3 top of the hock thin skin your fingers will slide into it on the inside of the back leg KI3  is a source point good for the kidneys which house original or prenatal chi. Fear is also housed in the Kidneys so this is a good point to dispel that.

KI 27   found between the sternum and the first rib and 2nd rib two fingers off the ventral midline good point for immune mediated disorders  brings up and releases old issues, great calming and release point do this after KI3

 

kidney  points

Full Article below 

Phobias may be memories passed down in genes from ancestors

Memories may be passed down through generations in DNA in a process that may be the underlying cause of phobias

Strands of DNA

Strands of DNA Photo: ALAMY
Richard Gray

By , Science Correspondent

6:00PM GMT 01 Dec 2013

Memories can be passed down to later generations through genetic switches that allow offspring to inherit the experience of their ancestors, according to new research that may explain how phobias can develop.

Scientists have long assumed that memories and learned experiences built up during a lifetime must be passed on by teaching later generations or through personal experience.

However, new research has shown that it is possible for some information to be inherited biologically through chemical changes that occur in DNA.

Researchers at the Emory University School of Medicine, in Atlanta, found that mice can pass on learned information about traumatic or stressful experiences – in this case a fear of the smell of cherry blossom – to subsequent generations.

The results may help to explain why people suffer from seemingly irrational phobias – it may be based on the inherited experiences of their ancestors.

Dr Brian Dias, from the department of psychiatry at Emory University, said: “We have begun to explore an underappreciated influence on adult behaviour – ancestral experience before conception.

“From a translational perspective, our results allow us to appreciate how the experiences of a parent, before even conceiving offspring, markedly influence both structure and function in the nervous system of subsequent generations.

“Such a phenomenon may contribute to the etiology and potential intergenerational transmission of risk for neuropsychiatric disorders such as phobias, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder.”

In the study, which is published in the journal of Nature Neuroscience, the researchers trained mice to fear the smell of cherry blossom using electric shocks before allowing them to breed.

The offspring produced showed fearful responses to the odour of cherry blossom compared to a neutral odour, despite never having encountered them before.

The following generation also showed the same behaviour. This effect continued even if the mice had been fathered through artificial insemination.

The researchers found the brains of the trained mice and their offspring showed structural changes in areas used to detect the odour.

The DNA of the animals also carried chemical changes, known as epigenetic methylation, on the gene responsible for detecting the odour.

This suggests that experiences are somehow transferred from the brain into the genome, allowing them to be passed on to later generations.

The researchers now hope to carry out further work to understand how the information comes to be stored on the DNA in the first place.

They also want to explore whether similar effects can be seen in the genes of humans.

Professor Marcus Pembrey, a paediatric geneticist at University College London, said the work provided “compelling evidence” for the biological transmission of memory.

He added: “It addresses constitutional fearfulness that is highly relevant to phobias, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorders, plus the controversial subject of transmission of the ‘memory’ of ancestral experience down the generations.

“It is high time public health researchers took human transgenerational responses seriously.

“I suspect we will not understand the rise in neuropsychiatric disorders or obesity, diabetes and metabolic disruptions generally without taking a multigenerational approach.”

Professor Wolf Reik, head of epigenetics at the Babraham Institute in Cambridge, said, however, further work was needed before such results could be applied to humans.

He said: “These types of results are encouraging as they suggest that transgenerational inheritance exists and is mediated by epigenetics, but more careful mechanistic study of animal models is needed before extrapolating such findings to humans.”

It comes as another study in mice has shown that their ability to remember can be effected by the presence of immune system factors in their mother’s milk

Dr Miklos Toth, from Weill Cornell Medical College, found that chemokines carried in a mother’s milk caused changes in the brains of their offspring, affecting their memory in later life.

 

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The Seasons Are Changing…So If Your Pet Is Approaching Their Senior Years Or Has Arthritis Now Would Be A Good Time To Start Working On Your Pet To Prevent Cold Weather Flare Ups

 

old-dog-cover

Arthritis will strike approximately 65% of dogs over the age of 10. And it’s not just a canine disease: Up to 30% of cats will suffer the pain of arthritis sometime in their life. Arthritis can strike any joint in the body, but the most common places we see it is in the spine, hips, elbows, and knees. In dogs especially, arthritis of the lower spine – called spondylosis – is extremely common, and probably the most common cause of rear limb weakness in older dogs.

Signs of spondylosis include difficulty getting up from a lying position, especially on slick surfaces, muscle wasting in the hips and thighs, dragging the rear feet when walking or trotting, and pain in the lower spine when manipulated.

The seasons are changing and Fall is here.. If your pet has arthritis, now is a good time to start working with him or her before the cold weather and winter sets in, as that can be a big trigger for arthritis flare ups.

If you have an older dog or cats odds are they will develop a bit of osteoarthritis. There are ways to minimize and hopefully prevent this. A species appropriate diet is very helpful. Exercise in moderation is also a great way to keep their joints happy and healthy. In addition weight control keeps a lot of stress off their joints.  Hydrotherapy and Acupuncture or Acupressure can be used prophalactically to help prevent or delay the onset. If your dog has been diagnosed with OA the above still applies but you can add a few more modalities eastern and western to the list to maintain a good quality of life.  There is information below and a new study published human based but interesting on acupuncture worked even better if used for a duration of at least a month and did not have the side effects of analgesics

Osteoarthritis, or degenerative joint disease, is a common disease that causes joint stiffness and pain. Dogs suffering from osteoarthritis will experience intermittent lameness and difficulty with exercise. The most effective course of treatments for osteoarthritis is a combination therapy of analgesics, to reduce pain, andnatural treatments that include:

  • Healthy diet and exercise
  • Hydrotherapy
  • Heat therapy
  • Comfortable environment
  • Chondroprotectants/
  • Acupuncture
  • Laser Therapy

Osteoarthritis gets progressively worse over time. Without treatment the dog can become severely debilitated. There is no cure for the condition. Treatment is aimed at reducing symptoms and slowing the degradation of joints.

Maintaining Healthy Weight with Diet and Exercise

Maintaining a healthy weight is the first step to alleviating joint pain. Extra weight means additional strain on the joints during movement. If a dog is overweight, a diet and exercise will be necessary to reduce stress on the joints.

Regular exercise can maintain joint flexibility and build or preserve muscle mass. Short walks of approximately 20 minutes should be done several times a day. The dog should be kept on a leash and restricted from activities such as jumping or standing on the hind legs. If a dog appears more uncomfortable and stiff after exercise, the regimen should be changed to an appropriate comfort level. The dog should not engage in activities that cause exertion or bouts of lameness. Physical therapy exercises, such as range of motion exercises, can also improve flexibility and strength.

Hydrotherapy for Dogs with Osteoarthritis

Some dogs may have difficulty even with short periods of exercise. Hydrotherapy, or water therapy, can provide beneficial exercise without putting stress on arthritic joints. The buoyancy of water prevents the weight of the dog from impacting the joints. The dog can then attain muscle strengthening and increased flexibility, without becoming sore or experiencing joint fatigue. Hydrotherapy can be done at canine rehabilitation centers or at home with:

  • Underwater treadmills
  • Physical therapy pools
  • Outdoors (lakes or ponds)
  • Sink or bathtub (for smaller breeds)

Heat Therapy for Osteoarthritis Relief

Moderate heat applied directly to the joints can increase circulation, enhance tissue healing and flexibility, and reduce stiffness. The heat should be low to moderate but not hot to the touch. Heat therapy can be easily done at home using:

  • Heat packs
  • Hot water bottles
  • Microwavable heat disks
  • Warm towels

A Safe and Comfortable Environment

Dampness and cold can aggravate the symptoms of osteoarthritis. A warm and soft place to sleep can prevent the dog from experiencing joint stiffness after periods of inactivity. Keeping the dog warm outdoors, with protective clothing, can also provide relief. Slippery surfaces indoors put an arthritic dog at risk for injury. Place non-slip rugs or mats in areas the dog uses to prevent falls or sprains. Ramps can assist a dog with osteoarthritis with stairs or jumps.

Read more: Natural Treatments for Osteoarthritis in Dogs

 Laser Therapy is another amazing option with good results.  Cold therapy laser is the newest FDA approved treatment modality to help combat the destructive inflammation of arthritis. Cold therapy laser uses infrared laser beams to stimulate what’s termed as Photobiomodulation, or light-initiated changes in the way that cells react. By applying high power infrared light to the cells in a joint, they are stimulated to actually heal themselves

Read more http://acupetvetcare.com/arthritis-pain/

Acupuncture reduces pain and improves functional mobility for patients with osteoarthritis. Researchers from the University of Manitoba, Canada, conducted a meta-analysis of 12 trials consisting of 1,763 patients with osteoarthritis. All trials compared true acupuncture with sham acupuncture, conventional treatments and no treatments. The study finds acupuncture effective in reducing pain intensity levels, increasing mobility and improving quality of life scores. A subgroup analysis reveals that patients receiving acupuncture treatments for intervention periods greater than 4 weeks have greater reductions in pain intensity levels than patients receiving acupuncture over a shorter duration of time.

http://www.healthcmi.com/Acupuncture-Continuing-Education-News/1365-acupuncture-calms-arthritis-pain-increases-mobility

Here are the main points from the study and a few others that have been used successfully.

Be sure and find a licensed Veterinary Acupuncturist or a Certified Animal Acupressure Practioner

Happy Pointing

 ST34 Lateral aspect of the thigh 2 cun above the outer border of the patella

Xiyan, ST35A  35B  two points on the lateral and medial side just distal to the patella

ST36 find the front of the knee and slide your finger down into the little groove on the lateral side of each knee

SP9 Medial aspect of the of the pelvic limb in the depression of the caudal border of the tibia and the gastrocnemius

GB34 Between the head of the tibia and head of the fibula on the lateral side of the back leg down from the kneecap. The point is found on the lateral aspect of the hind limb between the head of the tibia and fibula

 

KI3 BL60Top of the hock thin skin your fingers will slide into it on either side it is kind of like our Achilles this is actually two points KI3 and BL60

Bai Hui Dorsal midline in the lumbar sacral space

arthritis points blog

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If Your Pet Is Having Surgery Here Are Three Great Points To Help With Post Operative Pain And Inflammation

dog cast

If your pet is going to have surgery post operative pain and inflammation management is a very important part of a good recovery.  Pain can cause inflammation and inflammation can definitely cause pain. Check with your vet and make sure he or she is ok with adding this to your post operative plan.. The sooner you can get your pet back in balance the sooner he or she can start rehab if needed. These points will also work after an injury to reduce inflammation…Always see your vet if your pet has any sudden changes in gait ie limping or breathing or behavior…

These points were reviewed in an evidence based study explain how and why they work so click on the link below for all the details

http://www.healthcmi.com/Acupuncture-Continuing-Education-News/1416-anti-inflammatory-acupuncture-protects-from-adhesions

Points and diagram below happy pointing
GV20 dorsal midline between the ears there is usually a bump where the point is
GB7 On the dorsum of the head just above and inside of the edge of the base of the ear
ST36 find the front of the knee and slide your finger down into the little groove on the lateral side of each knee. If your pup has had knee surgery just do the point on the other knee, until the affected knee gets stronger and further in the recovery process

 

post surgery points st36 gv20 gb7

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